The Case For Sticky Web Sites

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Alan Jacobson contacted us about sticky sites. I admit this is more in Sadcox’s area of expertise but I thought I would pass this along to our readers.

According to Wikipedia, “Sticky content refers to content published on a Web site, which has the purpose of getting a user to return to that particular Web site or hold their attention and get them to spend longer periods of time at that site.”

In other words, visitors to sticky sites are more likely to click on internal links than external links, and less likely to visit a different site. This very narrow definition is important, because it can guide us to strategies for making sites stickier.

Now here’s why stickiness should matter to every journalist – especially those who still think they work only for print:

Go read his reasons on why he thinks news organizations need to follow this practice more effectively.

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2 Comments

  1. Adam Tinworth said January 7, 2009 | Permalink

    Good grief, I thought the “sticky content” mantra died four years ago. The last few years have made it plain that trying to keep visitors on your site at all costs is just counter-productive, while providing both compelling content and links to good stuff elsewhere creates loyalty and repeat visits.

  2. sadcox said January 7, 2009 | Permalink

    I go with Adam on this one. It seems like you should want your site to be sticky once for each visitor–the first time they visit. What you really want is repeat visitors–the same people coming back again and again.

    Think about your own browsing habits. Your favorite sites are probably the ones that you spent an hour on when you “found” them, but now you make shorter visits regularly.

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