Advice From Wired To Google

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Wired has some advice for Google on the newspaper industry.

While the New York Times was given an early death sentence this week by The Atlantic, Google CEO Eric Schmidt was asked by Fortune magazine what Google should do to save the ailing newspaper industry. He reiterated his previous “moral imperative” sentiment to do something, but failed to come up with any concrete solutions.

The internet behemoth thrives on curating the flow of information from media outlets, so it has a stake in the future of newspapers. But should Google necessarily intervene? Some think not.

“[The news] has changed permanently, Google is part of that change, Craigslist is part of that change, Facebook is part if that change,” said Jeff Jarvis, media blogger and author of the new book What Would Google Do. “That doesn’t mean they’re responsible for those who don’t adapt to that change. They’re not.”

Read the five things they suggest.

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One Comment

  1. Ron said January 9, 2009 | Permalink

    I don’t think the New York Times, under its current ownership, can be saved. They’ve had all the money in the world to throw at this problem for years now, and they’ve failed. Times Select, for example, was an awful idea. Most of the paper is wire service report fodder at this point; all the things they wanted me to pay to read online were things that are in my local paper for a cheaper price. Plus my local paper has coupons.

    Google isn’t the kind of company to waste money on charity purchases, either. Rupert Murdoch might, but an early web success probably isn’t going to have much interest in shackling itself to an industry in arrest (see AOL/Time Warner’s horrible merger for more detail).

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