Anatomy Of A News Story In The Digital Age

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Rooting around the tubes this last morning of 2008, I ran upon an article from Jim MacMillan. I wasn’t familiar with MacMillan, quite frankly, but he’s story of covering a fire was compelling and basically breaks down the anatomy of how new media works.

Here’s a snippet from what he experienced:

I had brought some of my aging professional gear but – fresh on the heels of my recent popular and successful Twitpic travelogue – I decided to stick with the camera on my iPhone and just post to twitpic.com, using the Twitterfon app.

This is a brutally limiting photographic strategy, but I posted my first picture online within a few minutes of my arrival on scene, and I wasn’t even hurrying. For all of their other expertise, none of the pros can shoot and send on one device.

The craziest moment was when one of my colleagues pointed out that he had better be sure to have an angle I was getting with my iPhone. I think he was kidding.

To break it down, the old newshound in him came out but he used Twitter and Twitpic to cover a fire. The immediacy of taking photos of the blaze with his iPhone which turned into a freelance gig for him.

He makes several good point and not to spoil his post where the last line he writes speaks volumes (I command you go there now), MacMillan’s commentary is textbook on the state of the immediacy of news and how delivery is constantly evolving, which is a word I rely on too much here at NewsTechZilla but it seems to apply quite well. His post is a perfect example of old school journalism combined with available (and I might add free) technology.

The rules now are that there are no rules.

H/T Buzz Machine

Newscoma

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